Category Archives: Health

Oil pulling for (dental) health Detoxification, fixing loose teeth, cavities & bleeding gums, tooth whitening and more

General introduction, background and instructions how and when to do oil pulling

See Oil Pulling Therapy: Effective Natural Detoxification, Stimulation of Elimination, Self-Help Cure and Prevention of Many Diseases Incl. Cancer?.

Oil pulling for oral detox, fixing loose teeth and cavities, strengthening teeth, stopping sensitivity, tooth decay & abscesses, eliminating bleeding gums

Oil pulling has been credited with a number of astounding oral health benefits since the times of Ayurveda, the oldest holistic healing system we know of. In Ayurveda, oil pulling is called “KAVALA GRAHAM”, and the Charaka Samhita sutra sthana chapter  states that “by oil pulling with til-taila (sesame oil), teeth are not affected with cavities and they become firm-rooted. Toothache and sensitivity to sour items will be healed and one will be able to chew the hardest items.”

According to oilpulling.org, Dr. Karach MD, the “author” of oil pulling, said: “The oil therapy heals tooth pain totally. Obvious results are re-fixing of loose teeth1 [which no dentist is able to do] the stopping of bleeding gums and the whitening of teeth.” Apparently, oil pulling also removes dental infections, stops further tooth decay, and reduces/eliminates sensitivity of teeth. Quote: “[Oil pulling] is analgesic in relieving pain, antibiotic in eliminating infection, anabolic in fixing loose teeth, reduces sensitivity of teeth like sensodant and also ensures oral hygiene. OP makes this possible by its influence on the nervous system, endocrine and immune systems towards a state of balance-is health-from an unbalanced state-ill health.”

Other oral benefits reported include the cleaning of a tongue that had been coated with a white-yellowish film,  the healing of aphtous ulcers and a salivary gland infection, no more tartar forming, a growth in the parotid gland which developed after starting oil pulling (likely incipient beforehand) completely healed within six weeks in combination with an exclusively raw food diet.

Sample oil pulling dental benefits testimonials

“I have been oil pulling with sunflower oil for over three years on a regular basis and I am sold. It was upon the advice of my dentist that I tried it.  My gums have much improved, since starting the routine redness, swellling and infections are gone, some of my teeth have become firmly reimplanted in their sockets! Additionally I’ve practically gotten rid of all tartar. Also no more sore throats and apart from a bit of sniffles at one point, hardly any colds worth mentioning! But that’s no wonder considering that all toxins and bacteria are bound to the oil and spat out.” (translated from the German by © Healing Teeth Naturally)

“….super-clean feeling in my mouth after oil pulling.”…”best and quickest remedy I have found for sensitive teeth is oil pulling with extra virgin olive oil”… “swishing with coconut oil2 several times a week…my yellow canine teeth have whitened considerably (I have tried without success bleaching, baking soda and peroxide, etc.) [and] my sensitivity in my teeth has decreased dramatically.”

“I have always had sensitive and really weak teeth [but after one month of oil pulling] no tingling feeling and just an overall healthy feel in my mouth”, “oil pulling has … reinforced … loose molar”, “At first, my breath stank but I stuck with it and [after six weeks of oil pulling] my breath is now fresh and my teeth are strong”,  “I had a brown discolored tooth and after 2 pulls the brown is gone. [Previously] I have had my teeth cleaned many times by a dentist and still had that brown tooth…”.

Last but not least, personally I find oil pulling helpful to dislodge stuck food particles from between my teeth (particularly those I wasn’t even aware of and which vigorous water rinsing hadn’t managed to budge!).

Scientific research into oil pulling’s dental health benefits

1. Effect of oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans  count in plaque and saliva

http://www.jisppd.com/article.asp?issn=0970-4388;year=2008;volume=26;issue=1;spage=12;epage=17;aulast=Asokan

Researchers S Asokan, J Rathan, MS Muthu, Prabhu V Rathna, P Emmadi, Raghuraman, and Chamundeswari at the Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India, studied the  “Effect of oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans  count in plaque and saliva using Dentocult SM Strip mutans test: A randomized, controlled, triple-blind study”.
Particularly, the study aimed “to evaluate the effect of oil pulling with sesame oil on the count of Streptococcus mutans in plaque and saliva of children, using the Dentocult SM Strip mutans test, and to compare its efficacy with that of chlorhexidine mouthwash.” (published in the Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry)

2. Effect of oil pulling on plaque-induced gingivitis: A randomized, controlled, triple-blind study

http://www.ijdr.in/article.asp?issn=0970-9290;year=2009;volume=20;issue=1;spage=47;epage=51;aulast=Asokan

Researchers Sharath Asokan, Pamela Emmadi and Raghuraman Chamundeswari of the Meenakshi Ammal Dental College, Chennai, India, studied the effect of oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis (published in the Indian Journal of Dental Research, this is a similar or identical study to number 1 above).

3. Effect of oil pulling therapy on dental caries (streptococcus mutans count in plaque and saliva) as well as plaque-induced gingivitis

http://iadr.confex.com/iadr/2008Toronto/techprogram/abstract_105440.htm

Researchers A. Sharath, J. Jeevarathan, M.S. Muthu, V. Rathnaprabu, E. Pamela, R. Raghuraman and G.S. Chamundeswari at the Meenakshi Ammal Dental College & Hospital, Chennai, India, studied oil pulling with the objective of assessing “the efficacy of an Indian folk remedy, oil pulling therapy using Sesame oil (Idhayam oil) on oral health status”. Randomized controlled triple blind clinical trials were performed evaluating the effect of oil pulling therapy on dental caries (streptococcus mutans count in plaque and saliva) as well as plaque-induced gingivitis.

4. Effect of oil-pulling on dental-caries-causing bacteria

http://academicjournals.org/journal/AJMR/article-full-text-pdf/21CA7A911094

Researchers T. Durai Anand, C. Pothiraj, R. M. Gopinath and B. Kayalvizhi of the PG Department of Microbiology, V. H. N. S. N. College, Virudhunagar- 626 001, India, studied the “Effect of oil-pulling on dental caries causing bacteria”.

“The effect of oil-pulling on the reduction of total count of bacteria was determined. There was a remarkable reduction in the total count of bacteria. The process of oil-pulling reduced the susceptibility of a host to dental caries. The in-vitro antibacterial activity of sesame oil against dental caries causing bacteria was determined. Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus were found to be moderately sensitive to the sesame oil.”

5. Effect of Oil Pulling on Plaque & Gingivitis

http://www.johcd.org/pdf/Effect_of_Oil_Pulling_on_Plaque_and_Gingivitis.pdf

Researchers HV Amith, Anil V Ankola, L Nagesh of the Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, KLES Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum, Karnataka, India, studied the “Effect of Oil Pulling on Plaque and Gingivitis” (published in the Journal of Oral Health & Community Dentistry).

6. Effect of oil pulling on halitosis and microorganisms causing halitosis: A randomized controlled pilot trial

http://www.jisppd.com/article.asp?issn=0970-4388;year=2011;volume=29;issue=2;spage=90;epage=94;aulast=Asokan

Published in the Journal of the Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry in 2011, this study compared the efficacy of oil pulling to that of chlorhexidine mouthwash. The researchers found that oil pulling therapy was equally effective as chlorhexidine for halitosis and the associated microorganisms. (A very impressive result considering the antimicrobial power of chlorhexidine.)

7. Mechanism of oil-pulling therapy – in vitro study

http://www.ijdr.in/article.asp?issn=0970-9290;year=2011;volume=22;issue=1;spage=34;epage=37;aulast=Asokan

This study aimed to determine whether the claimed effects of oil-pulling therapy on oral health were just due to placebo.

8. Apparently, in an experiment conducted in 1992 at the Maharishi University of Management (then called Maharishi International University), in Fairfield, Iowa, students rinsing their mouths with sesame oil showed an 85% reduction in the bacteria which cause gingivitis after six weeks of twice daily rinsing.3

Oil pulling and dental pain: sample testimonials

Oil pulling and toothache: after initially successfully trying salt water, beet green/spinach leaf/blackstrap molasses, a man told me that he “switched to oil pulling and had gotten more permanent results with that for my toothache as far as pain”.

A similar experience of first using salt water and then oil pulling with sesame oil which helped against toothache reads, “I have a tooth that the dentist did a root canal on and left it without a cap – result it got chipped and finally crumbled leaving a major hole. I did not feel anything for months since the pulp was dead but 2 days back I started feeling searing pain. So much so that I was ready to run to a dentist and beg that it be pulled off. Then I went to your site and read about salt water rinse. Tried it and on day 1- the pain completely disappeared. Second day however when I tried it again as my tooth hurt, it worked for a minute but the pain was back even stronger. I kept rinsing and the pain kept getting worse. I finally took some sesame oil in my mouth and started to oil pull. OMG OMG!!! The pain has been gone for 2 days now. Every time I drink something hot or cold – it starts again but I oil pull with sesame oil and it disappears. Hope this helps readers find relief from the toothache monster.”

Another person wrote that “[within 3 days of] doing this [oil pulling] practice the pain [from a loose painful tooth] was eliminated completely” and the tooth solidly set.

Oil pulling has provided help with pain from braces: “I had my braces tightened this morning. My teeth were killing me all day, then when I got home, I took a dessert spoonful of ‘cold pressed, unrefined sesame oil’ and oil pulled. It really helped and now my teeth don’t hurt as much, so if you know anyone who has braces, tell them!”7

Oil pulling has afforded help with pain from temporo-mandibular joint (jaw joint) disease and fibromyalgia: “I did not think I would be able to do this for 15 minutes due to jaw pain but after 2 1/2 minutes my jaw pain left. The stiffness, pain and soreness in my body was gone before the 15 minutes was up. I have been suffering from fibromyalgia since 1991 and this is the only thing I have tried that gave me immediately relief.”

Oil pulling helped remove large amounts of sore scar tissue in a person’s mouth which had been a source of discomfort for over 30 years and where nothing else had provided relief: “I’ve been oil pulling with cold-pressed organic sunflower oil approximately 25 minutes for almost three years now… Since I started oil pulling, I’ve noticed and felt an incredible difference in my teeth, gums and general oral health. My mouth has completely regenerated… no more plaque, no more scar tissue, healthy gums and amazingly white and strong teeth.” (This person has not been to the dentist for two years since.)

Oil pulling effects:
testing your saliva with pH test strips

Your saliva’s pH is very important for your dental health, see Demineralization/Remineralization).

To see what effect if any oil pulling has on my saliva pH, I have tested oil pulling by using pH test strips, measuring my saliva ph after getting up in the morning, after rinsing and cleaning my mouth with water and finally before and after oil pulling. After oil pulling, my saliva went from pH 8 to 7 to 8 again, i.e. became more acidic and then alkaline again.

Here are my sample results:

  • saliva pH after getting up, measured under tongue: c. 6.4
  • saliva pH after cleaning mouth with water, measured under tongue: c. 8
  • saliva mixed with sunflower oil pH after c. 15 min. of oil pulling: c. 7
  • saliva pH after cleaning mouth of oil via water rinsing: c. 8

Vegetable oils apparently are very weak acids so it is unlikely that the dramatic lowering of pH from 8 to 7 was due to my mixing my saliva with oil but rather can be explained by acid toxins or food residues being drawn during oil pulling from the mouth, from between the teeth etc.

Oil pulling and amalgam fillings

According to a German naturopath, people who carry amalgam fillings shouldn’t do oil pulling since such a practice would draw even more noxious substances from the fillings into the mouth. I enquired with oilpulling.org asking them to comment but they had no data on this subject. 

On the other hand, thanks to site visitor JR I learned that there is at least one person who has mercury amalgams in  every single tooth and who reports having only experienced benefits with oil pulling. Oil pulling or not, it is to be hoped that the amalgams won’t catch up with him at some point.6

Personally having no amalgam fillings I use oil pulling every day, and considering the potential benefits, I suggest you try including oil pulling in your dental routine as well. In case you should feel any initial aversion, it’s worth trying to overcome it… (remember – you are worth it ;-).

Oil pulling and implants (and other dental work)

Apparently, oil pulling can help with the healing process after dental implant surgery. According to a comment by an experienced user found on the internet, oil pulling is safe to do even with a mouth full of various dental restorations – from fillings and crowns to root canals and dental implants. Considering that the more dental work one has had done, the more places exist for bacteria to hide (and the greater the chances of dental toxicity), gentle oil pulling could be helpful in keeping the mouth and jaw clean.5

Oil pulling and damaged fillings or cracked teeth

I have not personally heard or experienced the following but wanted to pass on a warning I found on the internet maintaining that a number of people have reported pre-damaged teeth splitting while oil pulling and that they might wish to consult a dentist before starting the practice. Another one reported that after trying oil pulling a filling was loosened and all or part of the filling fell out.

On using olive oil for oil pulling

The late erudite father Thomas Häberle, an eminent but little known Swiss naturopath, used olive oil massages to great effect in a number of illnesses. He stressed that he reaped great successes using olive oil for diseases of the bones and head, writing that olive oil is able to penetrate even the hardest bones and  bring healing where it is needed. For this reason it seems ideal to use for oil pulling.

Father Thomas Häberle has left us three small but information-packed books on natural healing two of which have been translated into English, Helping & Healing and Counselling & Curing. Luckily, they are available (and inexpensively at that) via Abebooks.4

(Note: one person actually reported that swishing with olive oil straightened his teeth!)

Oil pulling and essential oils

I frequently add antibacterial essential oils such as peppermint, rosemary or tea tree oil to the oil I use for oil pulling, tastes great and likely does much good in terms of fighting harmful bacteria.

Oil pulling and dry mouth

If you suffer from dry mouth, in addition to hydrating yourself with water and if possible eliminating any root causes (such as certain medications), swirling oil in your mouth may help to eliminate this condition (compare Dry mouth [xerostomia]: on causes, remedies & treatments of inadequate natural production of saliva).

Oil pulling and tooth brushing

Judging by one person’s report that toothbrushing after oil pulling led to increased tooth sensitivity within a week it would seem advisable to not brush one’s teeth after doing oil pulling but if one wishes to brush, to do so beforehand. Conceivably, at least in some  people, oil pulling will cause a temporary softening of the enamel.

Important additional advice to maximise oil pulling’s dental health benefits

Since the oil only “pulls” between teeth and on the gum surfaces, I would always combine it with tongue cleaning to most effectively remove the streptococcus mutans “caries bacteria” which also reside on the tongue (more at Cleaning your tongue).

Interestingly, you may not need to clean your tongue for long since health writer Erika Herbst observes in her book “Die Heilkunst von Morgen” that coated tongues typically yield to oil (or water – see below) pulling over time.

Special tips

1 Pulling with xylitol

Oil pulling in addition to its purported or observed general healing benefits, basically is a particularly thorough way of rinsing one’s mouth. Did you know that you can also rinse your mouth with (special) sugar and help heal cavities and gum disease? This at least is the experience of a number of people who have tried it and found it highly beneficial. For this different type of “pulling” shown to be highly effective against tooth decay and to heal periodontitis, see Rinsing mouth and brushing teeth with xylitol sugar.

2 Pulling with plain water

Perhaps the best news: one can also rinse with pure water and reap similar benefits! For details see Water pulling as effective as oil pulling for teeth and gums? First trial study shows no statistically significant difference in oral bacteria and plaque reduction potential.

And if you use green tea or other herbs or substances with dental health benefits, you should do your teeth, gums and body an even greater favour (see the Dental Care & Oral Hygiene as well as Natural Remedies section for much herbal inspiration).

How Plants Help Each Other Grow By Near-Telepathic Communication

https://i1.wp.com/themindunleashed.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/plantss-is-1050x656.jpg

Plants have scientifically been show to draw alternative sources of energy from other plants. Plants influence each other in many ways and they communicate through “nanomechanical oscillations” vibrations on the tiniest atomic or molecular scale or as close as you can get to telepathic communication.

Members of Professor Dr. Olaf Kruse’s biological research team have previously shown that green algae not only engages in photosynthesis, but also has an alternative source of energy: it can draw it from other plants. His research findings were released in the online journal Nature Communications.

Other research published last year, showed that young corn roots made clicking sounds, and that when suspended in water they would lean towards sounds made in the same frequency range (about 220 Hz). So it seemed that plants do emit and react to sound, and the researchers wanted to delve into this idea further.

Working with chili plants in their most recent study, specifically Capsicum annuum, they first grew chili seeds on their own and then in the presence of other chili plants, basil and fennel, and recorded their rates of germination and growth. Fennel is considered an aggressive plant that hinders the germination of other plants around it, while basil is generally considered to be a beneficial plant for gardening and an ideal companion for chili plants.

Germination rates were fairly low when the seeds were grown on their own, lower when grown in the presence of fennel (as expected). Germination rates were better with other chili plants around, and even better with basil.

Since plants are already known to ‘talk’ through chemical signals and to react to light, the researchers separated newly planted seeds from the other plants using black plastic, to block any other kind of ‘signaling’ other than through sound. When fennel was on the other side of the plastic, the chemical effects of its presence, which would have inhibited germination of the chili seeds, were blocked. The chili seeds grew much quicker than normal though, possibly because they still ‘knew’ the fennel was there, ‘knew’ it had the potential to have a negative effect on their germination, and so they quickly got past the stage where they were vulnerable.

If even bacteria can signal one another with vibrations, why not plants, said Monica Gagliano, a plant physiologist at the University of Western Australia in Crawley.

Gagliano imagines that root-to-root alerts could transform a forest into an organic switchboard. “Considering that entire forests are all interconnected by networks of fungi, maybe plants are using fungi the way we use the Internet and sending acoustic signals through this Web. From here, who knows,” she said.

As with other life, if plants do send messages with sound, it is one of many communication tools. More work is needed to bear out Gagliano’s claims, but there are many ways that listening to plants already bears fruit.

According to the study: “This demonstrated that plants were able to sense their neighbours even when all known communication channels are blocked (i.e. light, chemicals and touch) and most importantly, recognize the potential for the interfering presence of a ‘bad neighbour’ and modify their growth accordingly.”

Then, to test if they could see similar effects with a ‘good neighbour’, they tried the same experiment with other chili plants and then with basil. When there were fully-grown chili plants in their presence blocked by the plastic, the seeds showed some improved germination (“partial response”). When basil was on the other side of the plastic, they found that the seeds grew just as well as when the plastic wasn’t there.

“Our results show that plants are able to positively influence growth of seeds by some as yet unknown mechanism,” said Dr. Monica Gagliano, an evolutionary biologist at UWA and co-author of the study, according to BioMed Central. “Bad neighbors, such as fennel, prevent chili seed germination in the same way. We believe that the answer may involve acoustic signals generated using nanomechanical oscillations from inside the cell which allow rapid communication between nearby plants.”

What Can Humans Learn?

Flowers need water and light to grow and people are no different. Our physical bodies are like sponges, soaking up the environment. “This is exactly why there are certain people who feel uncomfortable in specific group settings where there is a mix of energy and emotions,” said psychologist and energy healer Dr. Olivia Bader-Lee.

“When energy studies become more advanced in the coming years, we will eventually see this translated to human beings as well, stated Bader-Lee. “The human organism is very much like a plant, it draws needed energy to feed emotional states and this can essentially energize cells or cause increases in cortisol and catabolize cells depending on the emotional trigger.”

Bader-Lee suggests that the field of bio-energy is now ever evolving and that studies on the plant and animal world will soon translate and demonstrate what energy metaphysicians have known all along — that humans can heal each other simply through energy transfer just as plants do. “Human can absorb and heal through other humans, animals, and any part of nature. That’s why being around nature is often uplifting and energizing for so many people,” she concluded.

Michael Forrester is a spiritual counselor and is a practicing motivational speaker for corporations in Japan, Canada and the United States.

This is What Happens to your body when you exercise

Growing evidence indicates that both fasting and exercise trigger genes and growth factors that recycle and rejuvenate your brain and muscle tissues. These growth factors include BDNF, as just mentioned, and muscle regulatory factors, or MRFs.

 

One of the key health benefits of exercise is that it helps normalize your glucose, insulin, and leptin levels by optimizing insulin/leptin receptor sensitivity. This is perhaps the most important factor for optimizing your overall health and preventing chronic disease.

But exercise affects your body in countless other ways as well—both directly and indirectly. Here, however, even the most unexpected side effects are almost universally beneficial. For example, as illustrated in the featured article,1 side effects of exercise include but are not limited to:

  • Improved sexual function
  • Changes in gene expression
  • Clearer skin
  • Improved mood
  • Improved sleep

What Happens in Your Body When You Exercise?

The featured article in Huffington Post2 highlights a number of biological effects that occur, from head to toe, when you exercise. This includes changes in your:

  • Muscles, which use glucose and ATP for contraction and movement. To create more ATP, your body needs extra oxygen, so breathing increases and your heart starts pumping more blood to your muscles. 

    Without sufficient oxygen, lactic acid will form instead. Tiny tears in your muscles make them grow bigger and stronger as they heal.

     

  • Lungs. As your muscles call for more oxygen (as much as 15 times more oxygen than when you’re at rest), your breathing rate increases. Once the muscles surrounding your lungs cannot move any faster, you’ve reached what’s called your VO2 max—your maximum capacity of oxygen use. The higher your VO2 max, the fitter you are. 
  • Heart. As mentioned, your heart rate increases with physical activity to supply more oxygenated blood to your muscles. The fitter you are, the more efficiently your heart can do this, allowing you to work out longer and harder. As a side effect, this increased efficiency will also reduce your resting heart rate. Your blood pressure will also decrease as a result of new blood vessels forming. 
  • Brain. The increased blood flow also benefits your brain, allowing it to almost immediately function better. As a result, you tend to feel more focused after a workout. Furthermore, exercising regularly will promote the growth of new brain cells. In your hippocampus, these new brain cells help boost memory and learning. As stated in the featured article 

    “When you work out regularly, your brain gets used to this frequent surge of blood and adapts by turning certain genes on or off. Many of these changes boost brain cell function and protect from diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or even stroke, and ward off age-related decline.”

     

    A number of neurotransmitters are also triggered, such as endorphins, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, and GABA. Some of these are well-known for their role in mood control. Exercise, in fact, is one of the most effective prevention and treatment strategies for depression.

     

  • Joints and bones, as exercise can place as much as five or six times more than your body weight on them. Peak bone mass is achieved in adulthood and then begins a slow decline, but exercise can help you to maintain healthy bone mass as you get older. 

    Weight-bearing exercise is actually one of the most effective remedies against osteoporosis, as your bones are very porous and soft, and as you get older your bones can easily become less dense and hence, more brittle — especially if you are inactive.

Your Brain Health Is Directly Related to Exercise…

 

 

 

 

 

A related article published by Lifehacker.com focuses exclusively on brain-related changes that occur when you exercise. While I just mentioned that neurotransmitters, chemical messengers in your brain, such as mood-boosting serotonin, are released during a bout of exercise, that doesn’t account for all the benefits your brain reaps.

“If you start exercising, your brain recognizes this as a moment of stress. As your heart pressure increases, the brain thinks you are either fighting the enemy or fleeing from it. To protect yourself and your brain from stress, you release a protein called BDNF (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor). This BDNF has a protective and also reparative element to your memory neurons and acts as a reset switch. That’s why we often feel so at ease and like things are clear after exercising,” Leo Widrich writes.

Simultaneously, your brain releases endorphins, another stress-related chemical. According to researcher MK McGovern, the endorphins minimize the physical pain and discomfort associated with exercise. They’re also responsible for the feeling of euphoria that many people report when exercising regularly.

Scientists have been linking the benefits of physical exercise to brain health for many years, but recent research4, 5 has made it clear that the two aren’t just simply related; rather, it is THE relationship. The evidence shows that physical exercise helps you build a brain that not only resists shrinkage, but increases cognitive abilities. Exercise encourages your brain to work at optimum capacity by causing your nerve cells to multiply, strengthening their interconnections, and protecting them from damage. There are multiple mechanisms at play here, but some are becoming more well-understood than others.

The rejuvenating role of BDNF is one of them. BDNF activates brain stem cells to convert into new neurons. It also triggers numerous other chemicals that promote neural health. Further, exercise provides protective effects to your brain through:

  • The production of nerve-protecting compounds
  • Improved development and survival of neurons
  • Decreased risk of heart and blood vessel diseases
  • Altering the way damaging proteins reside inside your brain, which appears to slow the development of Alzheimer’s disease

Both Fasting and Exercise Trigger Brain Rejuvenation…

 

 

 

 

 

Growing evidence indicates that both fasting and exercise trigger genes and growth factors that recycle and rejuvenate your brain and muscle tissues. These growth factors include BDNF, as just mentioned, and muscle regulatory factors, or MRFs.

These growth factors signal brain stem cells and muscle satellite cells to convert into new neurons and new muscle cells respectively. Interestingly enough, BDNF also expresses itself in the neuro-muscular system where it protects neuro-motors from degradation. (The neuromotor is the most critical element in your muscle. Without the neuromotor, your muscle is like an engine without ignition. Neuro-motor degradation is part of the process that explains age-related muscle atrophy.)

So BDNF is actively involved in both your muscles and your brain, and this cross-connection, if you will, appears to be a major part of the explanation for why a physical workout can have such a beneficial impact on your brain tissue. It, quite literally, helps prevent, and even reverse, brain decay as much as it prevents and reverses age-related muscle decay.

This also helps explain why exercise while fasting can help keep your brain, neuro-motors, and muscle fibers biologically young. For more information on how to incorporate intermittent fasting into your exercise routine for maximum benefits, please see this previous article. Sugar suppresses BDNF, which also helps explain why a low-sugar diet in combination with regular exercise is so effective for protecting memory and staving off depression.

This Is Your Brain on Exercise

BDNF and endorphins are two of the factors triggered by exercise that help boost your mood, make you feel good, and sharpen your cognition. As mentioned by Lifehacker, they’re similar to morphine and heroin in their action and addictiveness—but without any of the harmful side effects. Quite the contrary! So, how much do you have to exercise in order to maintain a sunnier disposition and better memory long-term?

According to a 2012 study published in the journal Neuroscience, the “secret” to increased productivity and happiness on any given day is a long-term investment in regular exercise. And a little each day appears to go further than a lot once or twice a week.

“Those who had exercised during the preceding month but not on the day of testing generally did better on the memory test than those who had been sedentary, but did not perform nearly as well as those who had worked out that morning,” the authors note.

The reasons for this can perhaps be best perceived visually. Take a look at these images, showing the dramatic increase in brain activity after a 20 minute walk, compared to sitting quietly for the same amount of time.

 

There is a minor caveat, however. The researchers also discovered that exercise does not affect the brains of all people in exactly the same way. Some people, about 30 percent of people of European Caucasian descent, have a BDNF gene variant that hinders post-exercise BDNF production. The people with this BDNF variant did not improve their memory scores, even when exercising regularly, as significantly as those without this variant. Still, the research clearly suggests that—with individual variations as to the degree—regular exercise will cumulatively enhance your memory and other brain functions.

You Don’t Need to Train Like an Athlete to Reap the Benefits of Exercise

If you are sedentary there is hope for you. In her book, The First 20 Minutes: Surprising Science Reveals How We Can Exercise Better, Train Smarter, Live Longer, New York Times bestselling author Gretchen Reynolds addresses the issue of exercise as a way to improve longevity and happiness as well.

“The first 20 minutes of moving around, if someone has been really sedentary, provide most of the health benefits. You get prolonged life, reduced disease risk – all of those things come in in the first 20 minutes of being active,” she said in a 2012 interview.

“Two-thirds of Americans get no exercise at all. If one of those people gets up and moves around for 20 minutes, they are going to get a huge number of health benefits, and everything beyond that 20 minutes is, to some degree, gravy. That doesn’t mean I’m suggesting people should not exercise more if they want to. You can always do more. But the science shows that if you just do anything, even stand in place 20 minutes, you will be healthier.”

Similarly, research9 published in 2008 found that those who exercised on work days experienced significantly improved mood on days that they exercised. Interestingly, while their mood remained fairly constant even on non-exercise work days, their sense of inner calm deteriorated on those days. According to the authors:

“Critically, workers performed significantly better on exercise days and across all three areas we measured, known as mental-interpersonal, output and time demands.”

Key findings included:

  • 72 percent had improved time management on exercise days compared to non-exercise days
  • 79 percent reported improved mental and interpersonal performance in exercise days
  • 74 percent said they managed their workload better
  • Those who exercised regularly also reported feeling more than 40 percent more “motivated to work” and scored more than 20 percent higher for concentration and finishing work on time

But remember, it is FAR better to exercise regularly. I believe it is also vital to engage in regular movement if you have a sitting job like most of us do, including me. I typically sit in front of a computer for more than 12 hours a day. What I have recently appreciated is that standing up every 10 minutes (with the help of a timer) and engaging in some type of brief exercise, is an enormously powerful habit to minimize the damage of long term sitting.

Aim for a Well-Rounded Fitness Program

Ideally, to truly optimize your health, you’ll want to strive for a varied and well-rounded fitness program that incorporates a wide variety of exercises. As a general rule, as soon as an exercise becomes easy to complete, you need to increase the intensity and/or try another exercise to keep challenging your body.

Additionally, more recent research has really opened my eyes to the importance of non-exercise movement. Truly, the key to health is to remain as active as you can, all day long, but that doesn’t mean you train like an athlete for hours a day. It simply means, whenever you have a chance to move and stretch your body in the course of going about your day—do it!

And the more frequently, the better. Everything from standing up, to reaching for an item on a tall shelf, to weeding in your garden and walking from one room to another, and even doing dishes count. In short, it’s physical movement, period, that promotes health benefits by the interaction your body gets with gravity. To learn more about this important aspect of health, please see this previous article. That said, I recommend incorporating the following types of exercise into your program:

  • Interval (Anaerobic) Training: This is when you alternate short bursts of high-intensity exercise with gentle recovery periods.
  • Strength Training: Rounding out your exercise program with a 1-set strength training routine will ensure that you’re really optimizing the possible health benefits of a regular exercise program. You can also “up” the intensity by slowing it down. For more information about using super slow weight training as a form of high intensity interval exercise, please see my interview with Dr. Doug McGuff.
  • Stand Up Every 10 Minutes. This is not intuitively obvious, but emerging evidence clearly shows that even highly fit people who exceed the expert exercise recommendations are headed for premature death if they sit for long periods of time. My interview with NASA scientist Dr. Joan Vernikos goes into great detail why this is so, and what you can do about it. Personally, I usually set my timer for 10 minutes while sitting, and then stand up and do one legged squats, jump squats or lunges when the timer goes off. The key is that you need to be moving all day long, even in non-exercise activities.
  • Core Exercises: Your body has 29 core muscles located mostly in your back, abdomen and pelvis. This group of muscles provides the foundation for movement throughout your entire body, and strengthening them can help protect and support your back, make your spine and body less prone to injury and help you gain greater balance and stability.
  • Foundation Training, created by Dr. Eric Goodman, is an integral first step of a larger program he calls “Modern Moveology,” which consists of a catalog of exercises. Postural exercises such as those taught in Foundation Training are critical not just for properly supporting your frame during daily activities, they also retrain your body so you can safely perform high-intensity exercises without risking injury.
  • Exercise programs like Pilates and yoga are also great for strengthening your core muscles, as are specific exercises you can learn from a personal trainer.
  • Stretching: My favorite type of stretching is active isolated stretches developed by Aaron Mattes. With Active Isolated Stretching, you hold each stretch for only two seconds, which works with your body’s natural physiological makeup to improve circulation and increase the elasticity of muscle joints. This technique also allows your body to repair itself and prepare for daily activity. You can also use devices like the Power Plate to help you stretch.

 

Sensory Deprivation: Meditation Isolation Chambers

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An isolation tank is a lightless, soundproof tank inside which subjects float in salt water at skin temperature. They were first used by John C. Lilly in 1954 to test the effects of sensory deprivation. Such tanks are now also used for meditation and relaxation and in alternative medicine. The isolation tank was originally called the sensory deprivation tank. Other names for the isolation tank include flotation tankJohn C. Lilly tankREST tanksensory attenuation tank, and think tank.

Ever thought of what it would be like to have your sensory input completely cut off while in meditation? According to many people who have tried sensory deprivation they say it is a great form of therapy.. Imagine the “distractions” being completely cut off, leaving only pure unchecked consciousness. This is the essence of what sensory deprivation is.

The History of the Isolation Chamber

“John C. Lilly, a medical practitioner and neuro-psychiatrist, developed the flotation tank in 1954. During his training in psychoanalysis at the US National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Lilly commenced experiments with sensory deprivation. In neurophysiology, there had been an open question as to what keeps the brain going and the origin of its energy sources. One hypothesis was that the energy sources are biological and internal and do not depend upon the outside environment. It was argued that if all stimuli are cut off to the brain then the brain would go to sleep. Lilly decided to test this hypothesis and, with this in mind, created an environment which totally isolated an individual from external stimulation. From here, he studied the origin of consciousness and its relation to the brain.

Peter Suedfeld and Roderick Borrie of the University of British Columbia began experimenting on the therapeutic benefits of flotation tank usage in the late 1970s. They named their technique “Restricted Environmental Stimulation Therapy” (REST). -Wikipedia

Why An Isolation Chamber?

“A sensory deprivation tank can help activate your mental powers and even open a gateway to another universe. But what can floating in a dark warm tank do for you in real life? And why would people even want to do such a thing?” -said I09.com.

A sensory deprivation tank is a temperature regulated, saltwater (Epsom) filled tank that blocks all light, sound, and creates the illusion of being “weightless” like in space. The weightless feeling comes from the salt and the temperature regulated water. The water is warmed to “skin temperature” effectively making it feel like there is nothing touching you, but you’re floating. Imagine what it would be like to put your brain in a box with nothing else stimulating it besides the vastness of your consciousness. People have reported having incredible experiences like OBE’s and traveling the cosmos, to reaching a state of peace that is so therapeutic and positive that people swear by it and now regularly have sessions in the tanks.

By comparison, characterizations of sensory deprivation like this one by comedian Joe Rogan begin to sound downright grounded — and Rogan’s descriptions of hallucinations, heightened levels of introspection, and the sensation that the mind has left the body are actually among the most commonly reported experiences among tank users. Even renowned physicist Richard Feynman described having hallucinations and out-of-body experiences while using sensory deprivation chambers. -said I09.com

If you are interested in trying Sensory Deprivation, there is good news, there are centers in nearly every city at an affordable price. You can find a center near you here: http://floatation.biz/floatfinder/

Now that we’ve gone through the history and uses of the isolation chamber, I recommend watching these short videos to get a better perspective on some of the first hand experiences people have had with sensory deprivation.

Moringa oleifera: a plant with multiple medicinal uses

Moringa medicinal and healing properties: Perhaps the most remarkable thing about the Moringa is that it has such incredible health benefits over a wide-range of health issues. 

Moringa oleifera has an impressive range of medicinal uses with high nutritional value. Different parts of this plant contain a profile of important minerals, and are a good source of protein, vitamins, beta-carotene, amino acids and various phenolics. The Moringa plant provides a rich and rare combination of zeatin, quercetin, beta-sitosterol, caffeoylquinic acid and kaempferol.

Moringa oleifera is very important for its medicinal value. Various parts of this plant act as cardiac and circulatory stimulants, possess antitumor, antipyretic, antiepileptic, antiinflammatory, antiulcer, antispasmodic, diuretic, antihypertensive, cholesterol lowering, antioxidant, antidiabetic, hepatoprotective, antibacterial and antifungal activities, and are being employed for the treatment of different ailments in the indigenous system of medicine.

Moringa Leaves Medicinal uses and benefits

• Leaves rubbed against the temple can relieve headaches.

• To stop bleeding from a shallow cut, apply a poultice of fresh leaves.

• There is an anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory effect when applied to wounds or insect bites.

• Extracts can be used against bacterial or fungal skin complaints.

• Leaf tea treats gastric ulcers and diarrhoea.

• Eating Moringa food products is good for those suffering from malnutrition due to the high protein and fibre content.

* Leaves treat fevers, bronchitis, eye and ear infections, inflammation of the mucus membrane

* The iron content of the leaves is high, and they are reportedly prescribed for anemia in the Philippines.

* Dried Moringa leaves treat diarrhoea in Malawi, Africa.

* The powder ground from the seeds is also used in the treatment of scurvy skin diseases (common bacterial infections of the skin).

Moringa Flowers Medicinal uses and benefits

• Flower juice improves the quality and flow of mothers’ milk when breast feeding.

• Flower juice is useful for urinary problems as it encourages urination.

* In Haiti, villagers boil Moringa flowers in water and drink the tea as a powerful cold remedy.

Moringa Pods Medicinal uses and benefits

• If eaten raw, pods act as a de-wormer and treat liver and spleen problems and pains of the joints.

• Due to high protein and fibre content they can play a useful part in treating malnutrition and diarrhoea.

Moringa Seeds Medicinal uses and benefits

• Used for their antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties to treat arthritis, rheumatism, gout, cramp, sexually transmitted diseases and boils. The seeds are roasted, pounded, mixed with coconut oil and applied to the problem area. Seed oil can be used for the same ailments.

• Roasted seeds and oil can encourage urination.

• They can also be used as a relaxant for epilepsy.

Moringa seeds are effective against skin-infecting bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. They contain the potent antibiotic and fungicide terygospermin.

Moringa roots, bark and gum Medicinal uses and benefits

The roots and the bark have all of the properties described above but are more concentrated. Therefore much more care should be taken if using them as medicines.

* The roots and bark are used for cardiac and circulatory problems, as a tonic and for inflammation. The bark is an appetizer and digestive.

* In Senegal and India, roots are pounded and mixed with salt to make a poultice for treating rheumatism and articulars pains. In Senegal, this poultice is also used to relieve lower back or kidney pain
• Fodder-branches

* The alkaloid spirachin (a nerve paralysant) has been found in the roots.

* The gum is diuretic, astringent and abortifacient and is used against asthma.

Moringa Oil Medicinal uses and benefits

* Oil of Ben is used for hysteria, scurvy, prostate problems and bladder troubles.

* Villagers in Oman use Moringa oil to treat stomach disorders. They also use it in perfume and hair oil.

Moringa & Ayurveda Medicinal uses and benefits

Uses every part of the Moringa Tree and considers it one of the most valuable and useful plants. The ayurvedic medicine of India has many uses for Moringa Tree products, such as a natural antibiotic, an aid in childbirth, for treating liver disorders, and many other uses.

Moringa & Siddha Medicinal uses and benefits

In Siddha medicine says that the leaves are full of medicinal properties. The drumstick seeds are used as a sexual virility drug for treating erectile dysfunction in men and also in women for prolonging sexual activity.

Study

Medicinal properties of Moringa oleifera: An overview of promising healer

Moringa oleifera Lam. is a small size tree with approximately 5 to 10 m height. It is cultivated all over the world due to its multiple utilities. Every part of Moringa is used for certain nutritional and/or medicinal propose. Besides being a good source of protein, vitamins, oils, fatty acids, micro-macro minerals elements and various phenolics, it is also reported as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, anticancer, cardiovascular, hepatoprotective, anti-ulcer, diuretic, antiurolithiatic, and antihelmintic. Its multiple pharmaceutical effects are capitalized as therapeutic remedy for various diseases in traditional medicinal system. Further research on this charismatic healer may lead to the development of novel agents for various diseases. This study provides a brief overview about medicinal potential of Moringa and its future as a component of modern medicinal system. This study concludes that  Moringa  needs legitimate appraisal to establish its pharmaceutical knack in modern medicine.

Medicinal properties of Moringa

Moringa has enormous medicinal potential, which has long been recognized in the Ayurvedic and Unani system (Mughal et al., 1999). Nearly every part of this plant, including root, bark, gum, leaf, fruit (pods), flowers, seed, and seed oil have been used for various ailments in the indigenous medicine (Odebiyi and Sofowora, 1999), but recent research is also indicating about several active constituents for accepting its applicability in modern medicine (Table 1). Few representatives of these are discussed in this article.

Moringa Antimicrobial and antihelmintic effects

Antimicrobial components of Moringa have been validated after the discovery of inhibitory activity against several microorganisms. In a recent study, aqueous extracts of Moringa was found to be inhibitory against many pathogenic bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in dose dependent manner (Saadabi and Abu Zaid, 2011). Moringa extracts was also found to be inhibitory against Mycobacterium phlei and B. subtilis (Eilert et al., 1981). Leaf extract of Moringa was found to be effective in checking growth of fungi Basidiobolus haptosporus and Basidiobolus ranarums (Nwosu and Okafor, 1995). Another study involving aqueous methanolic extract and fixed oil against microorganisms was performed using Scenedesmus obliquus (green algae), E. coli ATCC 13706, P. aeruginosa ATCC10145, S. aureus NAMRU 3 25923, Bacillus stearothermophilus (bacterial strains) and Herpes Simplex virus type 1 (HSV 1) and Polio virus type 1 (sabin vaccine). Varying degree of antimicrobial activity was observed ranging from sensitive for B. stearothermophilus to resistant for P. aeruginosa (Ali et al., 2004). Beside antibacterial activity of Moringa oils, it also posses anti-fungal activity (Chuang et al., 2007). Study comparing relative antimicrobial activity of seed extracts against bacteria (Pasturella multocida, E. coli, B. subtilis and S. aureus) and fungi (Fusarium solani and Rhizopus solani) revealed that P. multocida and B. subtilis were the most sensitive strains, and their activity was influenced by cations (Na, K, Mg and Ca2+) (Jabeen et al., 2008).

Another relative comparison of antibacterial and antifungal efficacy of Moringa steam distillate observed more inhibition for E. coli followed by S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis. In case of fungi, Aspergillus niger was strongly inhibited followed by Aspergillus oryzaeAspergillus terreus and Aspergillus nidulans (Prashith Kekuda et al., 2010). Contrary to resistance against P. aeruginosa and Candida albicans for Moringa in other studies, one study using ethanolic extract of leaves, seeds and flowers showed the antimicrobial activity against E. coli, K. pneumoniaeEnterobacter species, Proteus mirabilisP. aeruginosaSalmonella typhi A, S. aureusStreptococcus and Candida albicans(Nepolean et al., 2009). Moringa contains pterygospermin (originally found in Moringa pterygosperma) which has powerful antibacterial and fungicidal effects (Rao et al., 1946). Several other specific components of Moringa have been reported with antibacterial activity, including 4- (4′-O-acetyl-a-L-rhamnopyranosyloxy) benzyl isothiocyanate, 4-(a-L-rhamnopyranosyloxy) benzyl isothiocyanate, niazimicin, benzyl isothiocyanate, and 4- (a-L-rhamnopyranosyloxy) benzyl glucosinolate (Fahey, 2005). Other bioactive compounds, such as Spirochin and Anthonine are found in root and are active against several bacteria. Anthonine has potent inhibitory activity against Vibrio cholerae (Nwosu and Okafor, 1995). Moringa flower and leaves are also capable of controlling parasitic worms, their antihelmintic activity has been demonstrated during several studies (Bhattacharya et al., 1982). Moreover, it has also been reported to inhibit Indian earthworm Pheritima posthuma with MO leaves ethanolic extracts (Rastogi et al., 2009).

Moringa Anti-inflammatory activity

Moringa plant parts have substantial anti-inflammatory activity. For instance, the root extract exhibits significant anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw oedema (Ezeamuzie et al., 1996; Khare et al., 1997). The crude methanol extract of the root inhibits carrageenan- induced rat paw oedema in a dose dependent manner after oral administration (Anonymous, 2005). Moreover, n-butanol extract of the seeds of Moringa shows anti- inflammatory activity against ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in guinea pigs (Mahajan et al., 2009). Amelioration of inflammation associated chronic diseases can be possible with the potent anti-inflammatory activity of Moringa bioactive compounds (Muangnoi et al., 2011).

Considering potent anti-inflammatory activity of Moringa plant, it can be surmised that this plant shows profound influence on inflammation associated diseases and resultant symptoms. As a consequence, this plant shows beneficial effects on asthma, pain, and other resultant symptoms.

Moringa Anti-asthmatic activity

It has been reported a long time ago that Moringa plant alkaloid closely resembles ephedrine in action and can be used for the treatment of asthma. Alkaloid moringine relaxes bronchioles (Kirtikar and Basu, 1975). The seed kernels of Moringa also showed promising effect in the treatment of bronchial asthma, during a study to analyze efficacy and safety of seed kernels for the management of asthmatic patients. The study showed significant decrease in the severity of asthma symptoms and also concurrent respiratory functions improvement (Agrawal and Mehta, 2008).

Moringa Analgesic activity

The analgesic activity of Moringa has been reported in several Moringa species. In a study using ethanolic extracts of Moringa concanensis tender pod-like fruits in experimental animals, a significant analgesic activity was observed (Rao et al., 2008). Furthermore, alcoholic extract of the leaves and seeds of Moringa also possess marked analgesic activity as evidenced through hot plate and tail immersion method (Sutar et al., 2008).

Moringa Antipyretic activity

As a result of anti-inflammatory action of Moringa bioactive constituents, the antipyretic activity can be hypothesized. A study was designed to assess antipyretic effect of ethanol, petroleum ether, solvent ether and ethyl acetate extracts of Moringa seeds using yeast induced hyperpyrexia method. Paracetamol was used as control during the study. Not surprisingly, ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of seeds showed significant antipyretic activity in rats (Hukkeri et al., 2006).

Moringa Antihypertensive, diuretic and cholesterol lowering activities

Moringa leaves contain several bio active compounds, they exert direct effect on blood pressure, and thus these can be used for stabilizing blood pressure. Moringa compounds leading to blood pressure lowering effect includes nitrile, mustard oil glycosides and thiocarbamate glycosides present in Moringa leaves (Anwar et al., 2007). In addition, diuretic activity of Moringa exists in its roots, leaves, flowers, gum and the aqueous infusion of seeds (Morton, 1991). Moreover, Moringa leaves also contain bioactive phytoconstituent, (that is, b-sitosterol) with cholesterol lowering effect. This compound is capable to reduce cholesterol level from the serum of high fat diet fed rats (Ghasi et al., 2000).

Moringa Antidiabetic activity

Several medicinal plants have been evaluated for their potential as therapeutic agent for diabetes. Moringa is also an important component in this category. Moringa leaves significantly decrease blood glucose concentration in Wistar rats and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, modeled type 2 diabetes (Ndong et al., 2007). Another study indicated that the extract from Moringa leaf is effective in lowering blood sugar levels within 3 h after ingestion (Mittal et al., 2007). As a mechanistic model for antidiabetic activity of Moringa, it has been indicated that dark chocolate polyphenols (Grassi et al., 2005) and other polyphenols (Al-Awwadi et al., 2004; Moharram et al., 2003) are responsible for hypoglycemic activity. Moringa leaves are potent source of polyphenols, including quercetin-3- glycoside, rutin, kaempferol glycosides, and other polyphenols (Ndong et al., 2007). Thus, potential anti- diabetic activity of Moringa can be commercialized through the development of suitable technology with achieving anti-diabetic activity up to conventional drugs.

Moringa Antioxidant activity

Moringa is a rich source of antioxidant (Chumark et al., 2008). It has been reported that aqueous extracts of leaf, fruit and seed of Moringa act as an antioxidant (Singh et al., 2009). During a study reporting antioxidant property of freeze dried Moringa leaves from different extraction procedures, it was found that methanol and ethanol extracts of Indian origin Moringa have the highest antioxidant activity with 65.1 and 66.8%, respectively (Lalas and Tsaknis, 2002; Siddhuraju and Becker, 2003). It was also reported that the major bioactive compounds of phenolics, such as quercetin and kaempferol are responsible for antioxidant activity (Bajpai et al., 2005; Siddhuraju and Becker, 2003). During another study, quercetin and kaempferol have shown good antioxidant activity on hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced Met phosphorylation with IC 50 value for 12 and ~6 µM/L, respectively (Labbe et al., 2009). Another recent study comparing palm oil with Moringa seeds for their antioxidant potential found out that Moringa seed are superiors for radical scavenging (Ogbunugafor et al., 2011).

Moringa Hepatoprotective activity

Moringa has shown significant hepatoprotective activity in several studies. Moringa leaves ethanolic extracts showed significant protection against liver damage induced by antitubercular drugs [isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RMP), and pyrazinamide (PZA)] in rats. It was found that hepatoprotective activity of Moringa is medicated by its effect on the levels of glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (aspartate aminotransferase), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (alanine aminotransferase), alkaline phosphatase, and bilirubin in the serum; lipids, and lipid peroxidation levels in liver (Pari and Kumar, 2002). Moreover, methanolic and chloroform extracts of Moringa leaves also showed significant protection against CCl 4 induced liver damage in albino rats. Besides hepatoprotective activity of Moringa leaves, its root and flowers also possess strong hepatoprotective activity. Moringa flowers contain a well recognized flavonoid (Quercetin), which may be responsible for its potent hepatoprotective activity (Ruckmani et al., 1998; Selvakumar and Natarajan, 2008). In a recent study evaluating the effect of Moringa seed extract on liver fibrosis, it was found that Moringa seed extract has the ability to subside liver fibrosis. This study involved CCl 4 induced liver fibrosis and concurrent administration of Moringa seed extract. Moringa seed extract control the elevation of serum aminotransferase activities and globulin level induced by CCl 4. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies also showed that Moringa reduces liver fibrosis (Hamza, 2010).

Moringa Antitumor activity

Moringa has been found as a potent anticancer plant and several bioactive compounds with significant antitumor activity have been discovered from Moringa. Among bioactive compounds from Moringa, niazimicin, a Moringa leaves thiocarbamate was found to have potent anticancer activity (Guevaraa et al., 1999). Furthermore, niazimicin also shows the inhibition of tumor promoter teleocidin B- 4-induced Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activation (Murakami et al., 1998). Another study involving 11 plants used in Bangladeshi folk medicine, Moringa was considered as potential source of anticancer compounds. During this study, the plant extract were analyzed for cytotoxicity through brine shrimp lethality assay, sea urchin eggs assay, hemolysis assay and MTT assay using tumor cell lines. The study also indicated the potential cytotoxic effects of Moringa leaf extract on human multiple myeloma cell lines (Costa-Lotufo et al., 2005; Parvathy and Umamaheshwari, 2007). Beside leaves, Moringa seed extracts also have anticancer activity through its effects on hepatic carcinogen metabolizing enzymes, and antioxidant property (Bharali et al., 2003).

Moringa Antifertility activity

Moringa plant also has pertinent antifertility activity. The aqueous extract obtained from root and bark of Moringa showed post-coital antifertility effect in rat and also induced foetal resorption at late pregnancy (Prakash et al., 1987). Moreover, aqueous extract of Moringa roots was also evaluated for estrogenic, anti-estrogenic, pro- gestational and antiprogestational activities. This extract induces several consequences for affecting its antifertility property (Shukla et al., 1988). During another study analyzing anti reproductive potential of folk medicine plants, Moringa leaf extracts were found to be 100% abortive with doses equivalent to 175 mg/kg of starting dry material (Nath et al., 1992).

Moringa Antispasmodic and antiulcer effects

Moringa root and leaves contain several compounds with spasmolytic activity. These compounds include 4- (alpha- L-rhamnosyloxybenzyl)-o-methyl thiocarbamate which is possibly affected through calcium channel blockade, niazinin A, niazinin B, niazimicin, etc., with hypotensive and bradycardiac effect. The spasmolytic activity of different constituents support for traditional uses of this plant in gastrointestinal motility disorder (Gilani et al., 1994). Moringa methanolic extract is also capable in protecting experimental rats from gastric lesions induced by acetylsalicylic acid, serotonin and indomethacin. In addition, it also enhances healing process of chronic gastric lesions induced by acetic acid in experimental animals (Pal et al., 1995). Another study have reported the antiulcer effect of Moringa leaves aqueous extract on adult Holtzman albino rats (Debnath and Guha, 2007).

Moringa Cardiac and circulatory stimulant

In addition to earlier mentioned bradycardiac effect of Moringa leaves, all parts of Moringa are reported with somewhat cardiac and circulatory stimulant activity. Root bark of Moringa contains alkaloid moringinine which acts as cardiac stimulant through its effect on sympathetic nervous system (Duke, 2001). The aforementioned effects can also result due to the prevention of hyperlipidemia. It has been demonstrated that Moringa prevent hyperlipidemia in male Wister rat due to iron deficiency (Ndong et al., 2007). During a study performing comparison of Moringa leaf extract with antenolol (a selective β 1 receptor antagonist drug, used for cardiovascular diseases) on serum cholesterol level, serum triglyceride level, blood glucose level, heart weight and body weight of adrenaline induced rats, it was found that Moringa leaf extract cause significant changes in cardiovascular parameters. This study reported Moringa leaf extract as hypolipidimic, lowering body weight, heart weight, serum triglyceride level and serum cholesterol level in experimental animals (Ara et al., 2008). In addition to the aforementioned studies, antiatheroscle- rotic and hypolipidaemic effect of Moringa leaves were also analyzed in another study using simvastatin as control (Chumark et al., 2008). Moringa also causes cardio protective effects in isoproterenol (ISP)-induced myocardial infarction in male Wistar albino rats. It was reported that Moringa treatment plays favorable modulation on biochemical enzymatic parameters including, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase-MB. Moreover, it also prevents histopathological damage and ultra-structure perturbation caused due to ISP induced myocardial infarction

Moringa In ocular diseases

Vitamin A deficiency is a major cause of blindness, which ranges from impaired dark adaptation to night blindness. Consumption of Moringa leaves, and pods and leaf powder which contain high proportion of vitamin A can help to prevent night blindness and eye problems in children. Ingesting drumstick leaves with oils can improve vitamin A nutrition and can delay the development of cataract (Pullakhandam and Failla, 2007). In fact the use of Moringa as a supplementary food was highly accepted for integrated child development scheme supplementary food (ICDS-SFP) for its potential as vitamin A source (Nambiar et al., 2003).

Conclusion

Medicinal potential of Moringa is enormous and difficult to cover in a single article, despite this current article provided glimpses of Moringa applications for performing appraisal of this promising nutrition and medicinal plant. Although, many bioactive compounds have been discovered from Moringa, still the knowledge is in infancy, in term of its total reserve. Perhaps, future rigorous studies directed towards the detection, and commercialization of Moringa bioactive compounds can lead to the development of remedies for several ailments. Thus, it can also prove the validity of traditional utility of Moringa in various folklores.

The Power Of Thought: Alter Your Genes and Cure any Disease

Cellular Biologist Bruce Lipton believes that humans can control their genes by changing their environment.

New age gurus, spiritualists and visionaries talk about the power of thoughts and how it manifests into reality. But when the same theory/concept is affirmed by someone from a scientific background, it helps bridge the gap between science and the spirituality.

Bruce Lipton, a cellular biologist and bestselling author of The Biology of Belief, advocates the idea that we have significant control over our biology, and with our intentions and beliefs we can ‘reprogram’ or ‘control’ our genes and our lives. This challenges the traditional scientific belief that genes control life and people attribute their illnesses to genetic dysfunctions.

For instance if cancer, heart failure or some other disease runs in the family, it doesn’t necessarily mean that a younger member of the family would also get those diseases, contradictory to the belief that diseases are hereditary. The genes can be altered by changing our environment and perception of that environment.

“You can control your genes by influencing your beliefs and personal attitudes. How I see the world and my perception controls not just internal biology and genetic behavior but it controls how I create a world around me, your mind’s perception of the world changes the biology and chemistry of your body which changes the cells in your body.”

Cells are like miniature people, since cells and humans have the same system like digestive, reproductive, immune and nervous systems. Each cell, like every human, has receptors built into its skin so it can become aware of the environment. If a person is in a stressful environment, every one of our cell is also experiencing that via the electromagnetic vibrations sent throughout our body. Similarly, if we are happy, our cells are happy and in harmony.

“Cells experience the same life you experience and it can survive outside of your body by living and growing in a tissue culture dish,” Lipton adds.

Research reveals that 95% of the time humans use their subconscious mind which is the habit mind programmed from childhood till the age of 6, after which your life is controlled by those habits. While the conscious mind, which we associate with our personal identity, our thinking and reasoning mind, is used only 5% of the time.

You might accept this message and might think that I will change or become positive and eliminate the negative thoughts, but in real that’s only your conscious mind talking, the subconscious wants to return to his old ways of repetitive patterns. We have to make a conscious effort to unlearn what we were programmed as children and not rely on habits and make a visible change in our lives.

According to Lipton, there are three ways that are effective in changing old, limiting or sabotaging beliefs in the subconscious mind, Buddhist mindfulness, clinical hypnotherapy and a new healing modality called ‘energy psychology.’ This change will eventually lead to a healthier living in harmony with nature and ourselves.

I encourage you to watch this video :

The Nettle Herb

The nettle herb is considered to be so powerful by some that legends say Jetsun Milarepa, one of Tibet’s most famous yogis and poets, lived on diet of nothing but nettle tea for years. Even further back, reports have been found that ancient Egyptians used a nettle infusion for the relief of arthritis and lumbago pains. Even Hippocrates and his followers reported 61 different remedies using nettle.

 

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Nettle herb, or Urtica dioica, is found in every single state in the US except Hawaii. While most consider it a pesky weed, others understand its true herbal value. The nettle herb is considered to be so powerful by some that legends say Jetsun Milarepa, one of Tibet’s most famous yogis and poets, lived on diet of nothing but nettle tea for years. Even further back, reports have been found that ancient Egyptians used a nettle infusion for the relief of arthritis and lumbago pains. Even Hippocrates and his followers reported 61 different remedies using nettle.

Today, not much has changed. Naturopaths and herbalists still consider the nettle to be among the most valuable herbal remedies. It is probably best known for its use in overall prostate health. It has been used in Germany for more than a decade to address enlarged prostates, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and has been shown to reduce symptoms by 86% after three months of use. Nettle does this by inhibiting the binding of a testosterone-related protein to receptor sites on prostate cell membranes. Nettle is particularly effective when used in combination with saw palmetto and Pygeum. Whereas saw palmetto protects against prostate enlargement caused by DHT, nettle root inhibits the proliferation of prostate cells in response to estrogen and SHBG.

Many scientists believe that one of the major culprits in the development of BPH is the testosterone metabolite dihydrotestosterone. This is supported by the fact that men deficient in dihydrotestosterone do not experience prostatic growth, and that treatment with prescription drugs which inhibit the production of dihydrotestosterone can decrease prostatic growth. An increase in the ratio of estrogen to testosterone in elderly men indicates that estrogen may also be involved in the development of BPH.

Studies have proven that extracts of Pygeum (unfortunately, now listed as an endangered species) and nettle root can effectively block the action of two enzymes involved in the body’s production of dihydrotestosterone and estrogen. Laboratory studies have shown that both pygeum and nettle root extracts were effective in inhibiting these two enzymes (5-alpha-reductase and aromatase) and that a combination of the two plant extracts was significantly more effective than either extract individually in blocking aromatase activity.

Nettle is also considered an extremely effective treatment for allergy symptoms, most notably hay fever since it contains biologically active compounds that reduce inflammation. Dr. Andrew Weil, M.D., well-known naturopath and author of several natural health books, says he knows of nothing more effective than nettle for allergy relief. Positive evidence of freeze-dried nettle leaf in treatment for hay fever, asthma, seasonal allergies and hives was discovered in a study conducted by the National College of Naturopathic Medicine in Portland, Oregon. It’s interesting to note that Australians have been using nettle for years as a treatment for asthma, but Americans didn’t catch on to this until about 1990.

Most notable about using nettle for allergy treatment is that over-the-counter treatments only treat symptoms and have some negative side effects such as drowsiness, dry sinuses, insomnia and high blood pressure. Nettle has none of these side effects and offers many other health benefits besides being a remedy for allergy sufferers.

The benefits of this herb do not stop here either. It has been studied extensively worldwide for a variety of conditions. You will find that nettle has been used to treat all manner of issues including: Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, asthma, bladder infections, bronchitis, bursitis, childbirth, gingivitis, gout, hives, kidney stones, laryngitis, multiple sclerosis, PMS, pregnancy, sciatica, and tendinitis! It’s even been used externally to help with baldness, oily hair, and dandruff.

Nettle is used in many forms, including as teas, tinctures, fluid extracts, creams and even a freeze dried leaf capsule.

 

Source :

http://www.icontact-archive.com/Jbq_Te5C5t3_2ZOcACWuzgDfd8vxB6JL?w=2